Choose a handheld

If you were after the more powerful (and expensive) x86-based handhelds, click here.

If you're after a more general introduction to handhelds, I strongly recommend giving https://retrogamecorps.com/ or https://www.rghandhelds.com/ a visit. Do note those websites focus more on handhelds in general, not Batocera, so the software included there is not supported here. This wiki page focuses solely on Batocera's compatible handhelds.

Console generations are referenced a lot throughout this. In no particular order:

Gen Consoles Handhelds
3rd NES, Sega Master System, Atari 7800 Not yet, unless you count Game & Watch.
4th SNES, Sega Genesis/Megadrive, Philips CD-i, Neo Geo, PC-Engine/TurboGrafx/SuperGrafx Game Boy, Sega Game Gear
5th Sony PlayStation, N64, Sega Saturn, Atari Jaguar Game Boy Color, Sega Genesis Nomad
6th Sony PlayStation 2, Microsoft Xbox, Nintendo Gamecube, Sega Dreamcast Game Boy Advance, Nokia N-Gage, Neo Geo Pocket Color
7th Nintendo Wii, Microsoft Xbox 360, Sony PlayStation 3 Nintendo DS, Sony PSP

There's more but that's the gist. In terms of power required to run, consider handhelds to be a generation and a half behind consoles.

Neo Geo Pocket-inspired form-factor. Has some minor build quality issues (non-OCA screen, wobbly face buttons) but those issues can largely be ignored. Supported since v32. Plastic shell; comes in tan, green or orange.

Features

  • 1.5GHz RK3326 CPU
  • 3.45“ 640×480 IPS display
  • Internal Wi-Fi
  • Two non-clickable sticks
  • Aligned L1/L2, R1/R2 buttons (digital)
  • Backlit buttons (optional)
  • Two additional function hotkeys (can be used for L3/R3 or volume)
  • One SD card slot
  • One USB C port
  • 3.5mm headphone jack (on top)
  • Stereo speakers
  • No volume buttons (can be scripted to function buttons)
  • Rumble

Performance

The 4:3 aspect screen lends itself to the systems it does well. Performs nearly identically to the Odroid Go Advance. It is capable of 5th gen and below well, though N64 has issues with specific games. Has very limited PSP support, some 2D games run well but 3D games are hit-or-miss. Dreamcast is “playable”, but sub 40FPS.

The upgraded version of the Powkiddy RGB10, featuring the same CPU. Build quality is great. Comes in black, orange or black-with-white-buttons.

Features

  • 1.5GHz RK3326 CPU
  • 5” 854×480 IPS display
  • Internal Wi-Fi
  • Wi-Fi on/off switch
  • Two clickable sticks
  • Aligned L1/L2, R1/R2 buttons (digital)
  • Two additional function keys
  • One SD card slot
  • Two USB C ports
  • Mono speaker (despite there being grills for two)
  • 3.5mm headphone jack (on top)
  • Volume rocker

Performance

3x integer scale for GBA games uses the entire height of the screen. Despite switching to a 16:9 screen, performance is the same as the RGB10 non-Max. Most systems you run will be 4:3, you can use “core-provided” aspect ratio to use black borders. It is capable of 5th gen and below well, though N64 has issues with specific games. Has very limited PSP support, some 2D games run well but 3D games are hit-or-miss. Dreamcast is “playable”, but sub 40FPS. Here's a demonstration video by Sonic Love Emulation.

anbernic_rg351v.jpg

The Batocera build for this handheld is still in alpha and may have severe bugs/compatibility issues. You have been warned!

The build for this device has gone MIA. It is not compatible with Batocera at the moment.

Not to be confused with the RG351P/M, which use an entirely different form factor. The long-awaited upgrade to the original RG300, uses the Game Boy-inspired shell with the internals of the RG351P. Slightly larger than a Game Boy Color. Has an operating system with EmulationStation installed by default so moving to Batocera's EmulationStation should feel familiar. Praised for its superb build quality. Plastic shell; comes in translucent grey, white or with a wood grain pattern.

Features

  • 1.5GHz RK3326 CPU
  • 3.5“ 640×480 IPS display
  • Internal WiFi
  • One clickable stick
  • Aligned L1/L2, R1/R2 buttons (digital)
  • One additional function button (can be used for Hotkey)
  • Two SD card slots
  • Two USB C ports
  • Mono speaker
  • 3.5mm headphone jack (on bottom)
  • Volume rocker

Performance

Its 4:3 aspect ratio display lends itself well to 2x upscaling PS1 games. Performs nearly identically to the Odroid Go Advance. It is capable of 5th gen and below well, though N64 has issues with specific games. Has very limited PSP support, some 2D games run well but 3D games are hit-or-miss. Dreamcast is “playable”, but sub 40FPS.

Not to be confused with the RG350P/M, as it uses different architecture internally. Has an operating system with EmulationStation installed by default so moving to Batocera's EmulationStation should feel familiar. Praised for its superb build quality. The P (plastic) version comes in three colors, whethers the M (metal) version comes in silver or metallic red.

Features

  • 1.3-1.5GHz RK3326 CPU
  • 3.5” 480×320 IPS display
  • Internal WiFi (M model only)
  • Two clickable sticks
  • Aligned L1/L2, R1/R2 buttons (digital)
  • A single SD card slot
  • Two USB C ports
  • Stereo speakers
  • 3.5mm headphone jack (on top)
  • Volume wheel
  • Rumble

Performance

Its 3:2 aspect ratio screen perfectly upscales GBA at 2x integer resolution, but other systems may have black borders, shrinking the screen size a little. Performs nearly identically to the Odroid Go Advance. It is capable of 5th gen and below well, though N64 has issues with specific games. Has very limited PSP support, some 2D games run well but 3D games are hit-or-miss. Dreamcast is “playable”, but sub 40FPS.

A larger revision of the Odroid Go Advance, still using the same CPU at the same clock. Around the same size as the Switch Lite. There are still some minor build quality issues, but they can be largely ignored. Plastic shell; comes in translucent or grey.

Features

  • 1.3GHz RK3326 CPU
  • 5“ 854×480 IPS display
  • No internal Wi-Fi
  • Two non-clickable sticks
  • Aligned L1/L2, R1/R2 buttons (digital)
  • Four additional function buttons (can be used for L3/R3 and Hotkey)
  • One SD card slot
  • A USB C port and a full-sized (!) USB 2.0 port
  • Mono speaker
  • 3.5mm headphone jack (on top)
  • Volume rocker

Performance

Despite switching to a 16:9 screen ratio and adding a right stick, the device still performs nearly identically to the Odroid Go Advance. It is capable of 5th gen and below well, though N64 has issues with specific games. Has very limited PSP support, some 2D games run well but 3D games are hit-or-miss. Dreamcast is “playable”, but sub 40FPS. Here's a demonstration video by LOE TECH.

Basically a more polished version of the Odroid Go Advance/RK2020. Build quality is great. The metal shell comes in metallic black. The plastic shell comes in black, grey or yellow.

Features

  • 1.5GHz RK3326 CPU
  • 3.5” 480×320 IPS display
  • No internal Wi-Fi
  • One non-clickable stick
  • Aligned L1/L2, R1/R2 buttons (digital)
  • Two additional function keys (can be used for L3 and Hotkey)
  • One SD card slot
  • A USB C port and a full-sized (!) USB 2.0 port
  • Mono speaker
  • 3.5mm headphone jack (on top)
  • No dedicated volume keys (can be added via scripting)

Performance

Performs nearly identically to the Odroid Go Advance. It is capable of 5th gen and below well, though N64 has issues with specific games. Has very limited PSP support, some 2D games run well but 3D games are hit-or-miss. Dreamcast is “playable”, but sub 40FPS. Here's a demonstration video by Sonic Love Emulation.

Basically a pre-assembled version of the Odroid Go Advance. Some would say a “clone”. First production units had a battery issue, but this was resolved in later manufacturing runs. Build quality is kind of crummy (visible seams, no passive heatsink) but is slightly better than that of the Odroid Go Advance. The plastic shell comes in translucent indigo or translucent black. The metal shell comes in black.

Features

  • 1.3GHz RK3326 CPU
  • IPS display
  • No internal Wi-Fi
  • One non-clickable stick
  • Aligned L1/L2, R1/R2 buttons (digital)
  • One SD card slot
  • A USB C port and a full-sized (!) USB 2.0 port
  • Mono speaker
  • 3.5mm headphone jack (on top)
  • No volume buttons

Performance

Performs identically to the Odroid Go Advance. It is capable of 5th gen and below well, though N64 has issues with specific games. Has very limited PSP support, some 2D games run well but 3D games are hit-or-miss. Dreamcast is “playable”, but sub 40FPS.

A do-it-yourself assembly case for the Odroid Go Advance board. Not to be confused with the Odroid Go, which uses a much weaker board and a Game Boy inspired form-factor. The original had a translucent case that could be easily dyed, the later v2 revision only came in black (and thus is referred to as the “Black” edition). The build quality of the original is kind of crummy (visible seams, no passive heatsink), but was improved with Black edition. The easiest handheld to physically modify due to compatibility with other button sets/ease of dyeing.

Features

  • 1.3GHz RK3326 CPU
  • 480×320 TFT display
  • Internal Wi-Fi (Black edition only)
  • One non-clickable stick
  • Aligned L1/L2, R1/R2 buttons (digital) (L2/R2 added in Black edition only)
  • Four additional function buttons (can be used for L3/R3 and Hotkey)
  • One SD card slot
  • One USB C port (v1 has barrel jack) and a full-sized (!) USB 2.0 port
  • Mono speaker
  • 3.5mm headphone jack (on top)
  • No volume buttons (can be scripted to function buttons)

LED control

Some people find the constantly flashing LEDs to be very intrusive. Here's how to turn them off:

This command will turn the blue LED to MicroSD card access:

echo mmc0 > /sys/bus/platform/drivers/leds-gpio/gpio_leds/leds/blue:heartbeat/trigger

and following one will turn it off completely:

echo none > /sys/bus/platform/drivers/leds-gpio/gpio_leds/leds/blue:heartbeat/trigger

To execute this code automatically at each startups, just put it on a text file and save it as /userdata/system/custom.sh

Credit to neko on the forums for this tip.

Performance

It is capable of 5th gen and below well, though N64 has issues with specific games. Has very limited PSP support, some 2D games run well but 3D games are hit-or-miss. Dreamcast is “playable”, but sub 40FPS. Most current handhelds use the same chipset at this board and thus has very similar performance to it.

This case is essentially a Raspberry Pi Zero inside of a Game Boy-inspired case, and its performance is identical to the Raspberry Pi Zero. The first handheld supported officially by Batocera! Keep in mind that you will need to either buy one with a Pi Zero already installed or provide the Pi Zero yourself (without soldered pins)! May also be compatible with the CM3+ mod, but that has yet to be implemented/tested. Build quality is exceptional. The plastic shell comes in grey.

You can install the script to be able to use its power button by following the instructions on this page.

Features

  • 1GHz ARM CPU
  • 2.8“ IPS display
  • Internal Wi-Fi (Pi Zero W only)
  • Stealthy L and R buttons
  • A single SD card slot
  • Two micro-USB ports
  • Mono speaker
  • 3.5mm headphone jack (on bottom)
  • Volume wheel
  • 3xAA battery powered

Performance

Performance is identical to the Raspberry Pi Zero, ie. it can do up to 4th gen consoles at full speed (with the help of some lesser-than-accurate emulators). 5th gen consoles is a stretch but possible with optimization of settings. Unfortunately it's missing some buttons/sticks for all later the systems it can run, but that can be worked around on a per-game basis or it might not matter at all if you only intend on playing 5th gen portable handheld games and below.

You won't need a backlight mod for this!

  • choose_a_handheld.txt
  • Last modified: 5 weeks ago
  • by atari